Category Archives: Meditation

Vow To Show Up, Share, Notice…

The yoga sutras tell us that if we want to be successful at yoga, our practice must be steady and consistent, performed over time and done with love. In this way, we foster steadiness in our lives and thoughts.

The bodhisattva is an enthusiastic spiritual practitioner who devotes their life to service and awakening. They do this for the good of themselves, and even more so for the love of all beings.

Vow to show up…pay little attention to any worries about when to practice, what technique, what length of time. The most important thing is to arrive, set our intention to bring our practice to life.

Vow to share…harness the goodness we cultivate and offer it to the world. Through sharing, we ensure this stays alive in our collective hearts and minds.

Vow to notice…our practice is a tool for unearthing and tethering ourselves to the qualities of peace, faith, love, and patience. These benefits show up unannounced when we least expect them and when we most need them. Realize, embrace, notice this gift.

Take our seat, be at ease.

Thank ourselves for taking the time to show up and practice.

Whatever we commit to, wherever we put our energy, will flourish.

Like any relationship, be it yoga practice, a marriage, a business, if it is to grow, there has to be a commitment.

Bring our hands to our heart.

Bow our head in appreciation of these commitments we make to ourselves and others.

I am the bodhisattva of my life, a noble and awakened heart.

I vow to show up.

I vow to share.

I vow to notice.

May this practice fall like a snowflake into the hearts and minds of those in need.

– Author and Yoga Teacher, Gabrielle Harris

Focused Vision, Focused Life…

In yoga, the Sanskrit word drshti (drishtee) is seeing, or inner vision. It also refers to the act of gazing at a focal point. Practicing drshti can be as simple as choosing a spot on the wall to look at to help maintain our balance in a yoga pose. Eventually this external gazing turns into gazing inward, perhaps concentrating on our intuition or heart center. To focus means to steady ourselves, to direct our attention, to concentrate.

Concentration is a limb of yoga (Dharana). It’s just as important as practicing asana/postures. Without concentration, we cannot meditate, and we lose out on the first goal of yoga, which is to steady the chitter chatter of our minds.

To concentrate, we reduce the distractions that surround us. Through drshti, we temporarily narrow the scope of our vision. We temporarily put on blinders so that we can have a deeper experience with one thing rather than a broad experience of many things.

In yoga asana class, discipline yourself to keep your drshti gaze, no matter what posture you are in or how you are moving to / through them. Be aware of the room and other practitioners, yet narrow your focus, keep your eyes still and relaxed, gazing at one spot. Work to also keep your body still between postures and during postures. Lessen your fidgeting – for yourself, and also for other practitioners. Yogis work to limit our negative impacts on others – our movements, our words, our actions. Be rigorous, self-disciplined, and compassionate with yourself.

In this way, we begin to direct not just our attention, but also our lives. The more we practice concentrating and paying attention, the easier it becomes. We learn we can sharpen into focus, and then go back out broad with our level of awareness. We become very efficient, because our minds stay still while we perform the task at hand. We begin to tether ourselves to this deep well of peace within us, no matter how hectic things are around us.

Intuition Is Soul Guidance…

Intuition is soul guidance, appearing naturally in man during those instants when his mind is calm. Nearly everyone has had the experience of an inexplicable correct “hunch” or has transferred his thoughts effectively to another person.

The human mind, free from the static of restlessness, can perform through its antenna of intuition all the functions of complicated radio mechanisms – sending and receiving thoughts and tuning out undesirable ones. As the power of a radio depends on the amount of electrical current it can utilize, so the human radio is energized according to the power of will possessed by each individual.

All thoughts vibrate eternally in the cosmos. By deep concentration, a master is able to detect the thoughts of any mind, living or dead. Thoughts are universally and not individually rooted; a truth cannot be created, but only perceived. The erroneous thoughts of man results from imperfections in his discernment. The goal of yoga science is to calm the mind, so that without distortion, it may mirror the divine vision in the universe. – Autobiography of a Yogi, Paramahansa Yogananda

Soul guidance, intuition, is achieved through a calm mind. Calm mind is achieved through distancing ourselves from the chitter chatter of our minds. In yoga, we learn 95% of our thoughts are misperceptions – why on earth would we rely on our thoughts for our answers, especially when intuition is accessible to us? To tap into intuition, the mind is still, no waves. We need extreme discipline of the mind, and our actions, to tether ourselves to our intuition. Is our society, in all of our petty grievances, truly mirroring the divine vision in the universe? What can we do individually to allow the pendulum to swing towards, rather than away from, this divine vision? Take ownership and responsibility for our minds, meditate, practice pranayama and asana, limit our intake of unnecessary or unproductive information and conversations, maintain a Drishti gaze, practice staying in the present moment as if we are training for an iron man, compassionately yet firmly, directing the mind back each time it wanders.

Stopping Thoughts…

We can naturally stop our thoughts if we focus our attention fully on our in-breath and our out-breath. After one or two minutes of practice, the quality of our breath will improve. Our breath will become deeper, slower, and more harmonious and peaceful, whether we are lying down, sitting, or walking. By practicing mindful breathing, we bring elements of harmony and peace into our bodies.

In a few breaths, our brain chemistry begins to alter – conscious breathwork helps loosen the grip of anxiety, depression, agitation, stress. Our breath helps create a bit of space to see things more clearly, peacefully. If meditation sounds too difficult, perhaps try breathwork.

(inspiration from “Your True Home” by Thich Nhat Hahn)

Asana as an expression of mantra…

Asana = action done with ease and attention.

What if we can change how we experience asana – and have it become an energetic expression of the mantra we are working with, rather than identifying with it as merely as it’s physical form? I’ve been working on my mat with “loving grace” – in every breath, every movement, every posture, I tap into this energy of what it feels like to be in this posture with loving grace. I ask myself what does a loving graceful breath, movement, posture feel like as I’m expressing it. This effort extends to my day – what do my daily routines look and feel like when I’m grounded in loving grace? Working with colleagues in loving grace. Having conversations with family and friends in loving grace. Running errands in loving grace. When I forget, or fall asleep, I wake myself back up and try again. Over time, with practice, we can transform ourselves and our whole experience (perspective) into something more productive for ourselves and our world.

Go Grow!

Breathe In “Serve” Breathe Out “God”

This simple breathing meditation has been incredibly helpful for me and I thought it may be helpful to you, too!

Start becoming aware of your breath and create a slow, deep, even inhale and exhale from your nose. It may be a for a count of 4, 5, or 7 – we all have a different breath cycle, so make it your own deep even breath. As you inhale, meditate on “Serve”. As you exhale, meditate on “God”.

As I move through each moment of my day, I go back to this breathing meditation. When anxiety fills me, or my heart becomes heavy, or my mind starts it’s incessant chitter chatter, I go back to: Inhale Serve, Exhale God. Everything slows down. Crystal clarity returns. Worry resolves itself. Stress melts away. I step back into my true purpose – in each moment, Serve God.

Dying in “s” self to Live in “S” self…

As I lay here in Savasana, I come into stillness and surrender.

I allow myself to feel completely supported…

Because I am supported.

By something far greater than anything anyone can imagine. God.

 

 

 

 

 

I relax into the comfort of being supported and connected to God.

Inhaling, and God approaches me.
Holding the inhalation, and God remains in me.
Exhaling, and I approach God.
Holding the exhalation, and surrender to God.

I allow my whole body; physically, mentally, emotionally, energetically – to surrender.

Surrendering my little “s” self so that I may live in my higher “S” self.

To see clarity in God’s purpose for my life.

Breath by breath, moment by moment.

From the moment I was born until the moment I die, using the breath to come back into the simplicity of life lived through God’s plan.

Give Birth To Yourself…

When you accept you are here for a limited amount of time, you will find yourself paying more attention to your heart’s wisdom – what feels good, what makes you happy – rather than what your head and intellect tell you to do or what others demand of you. Don’t wait for a disaster to awaken you! Let your untrue self die – and give birth to yourself. – Bernie Siegel

Complete Mastery Over The Roaming Tendancies Of The Mind Is Yoga…

By Pandit Rajmani Tigunait, PhD

Complete mastery over the roaming tendencies of the mind is Yoga. (Yoga Sutra 1:2)

The mind is a repository of all our thoughts, feelings, and memories. It is a storehouse of our likes and dislikes. We see the world – and ourselves through the eye of our mind. When the mind is clear and peaceful, we see the world as bright and peaceful. When the mind is convoluted, our understanding of the world and our relationship with it becomes equally convoluted. Our concepts of good and bad, right and wrong, depend on the quality of our mind, as do our likes and dislikes. The quality of our mind, in turn, shapes our thoughts, speech, and actions.

Memories pertaining to our deeds and experiences are deposited deep in our mind. These memories – subtle mental impressions – agitate our mind from deep within. Propelled by these impressions, the mind thinks and acts. Impressions and the thoughts and actions propelled by them are endless. That is why we find our mind constantly chasing one object after another. It has almost forgotten how to be still and be aware of its thoughts and actions.

The mind is disturbed because deep within the elements of attachment, desire, anger, fear, and doubt are active and the mind is operating under their influence. The mind is stupefied – dark, dense, and dull – because deep inside the elements of worry, grief, dejection, and hopelessness are active and have rendered the mind inert. The mind is distracted because disturbance and stupefaction are mingled with enthusiasm, courage, motivation, clarity, and purposefulness – and all these elements are randomly active. As a result, the mind is partly focused and partly dissipated.

A mind caught in any of these three states lacks clarity. It has no confidence in it’s own powers and privileges. It is indecisive and only halfheartedly willing to act on its thoughts and ideas. It seeks validation from external sources. When propelled by a disturbed, stupefied, or distracted mind, our endeavors, no matter how noble, bear little fruit. The fruit they do bear is invariably tainted by doubt, uncertainty, and fear.

This is where the quest for (samadhi) a perfectly still state of mind begins.

The mind becomes one-pointed when the elements of purity, clarity, and peacefulness are active deep within. Acting under the influence of these elements, the mind regains its power of illumination (sattva). A one-pointed mind is stable. It no longer grieves over the past nor worries about the future. The elements of disturbances, stupefaction, and distraction have been put to rest. The mind is serenely active and flowing peacefully inward.

Now the practice of Yoga, in its truest sense, has begun.

Live While You Are Alive…

Live while you are alive…

Learn to be what you are in the seed of your spirit

Learn to free yourself from all the things that have molded you

And which limit your secret and undiscovered road…

Never forget that love

Requires that you be

The greatest person you are capable of being,

Self-generating and strong and gentle –

You are your own hero and star…

Be grateful for life as you live it,

And may a wonderful light

Always guide you along the unfolding road.