Tag Archives: mindfulness

Letting Go of Labels…

As human beings, we’re exactly the same – energy / light in the container of the human body. Unfortunately, we all identify with our many layers of labels, and it prevents us from seeing each other as human beings. Thinking of ourselves as “white” “black” “gay” “straight” “Buddhist” “Christian” “woman” “man” – whatever the label… is an obstacle that prevents us and others from discovering the pure human being in us. Of course, labels are an important part of our ego self-identification, but the label is not the essence of who we are. We get wrapped up in the labels, the notions and images of what the label means, and we fail to recognize each other as simply human beings – energy / light / goodness. It’s all there, underneath the layers of labels that separate us or make us feel more important or different from another person. The practice of peeling away all the labels so that our humanness can be revealed is truly a practice for peace and understanding.

Inspired from reading Your True Home by Thich Nhat Hahn

Listening, Silence, Presence…

A quiet place is a thinktank for the soul. Silence is an endangered species that we must preserve. Silence is not an absence of sound, it’s an absence of noise.

We create a lot of noise. As creatures among other creatures, what sounds of ours can become part of the greater soundscape – part of the silence? What is our message in the sounds that we create? Can we apply our own artistic sense, our own signature, our sense of timing, to the grand performance that creates a sense of place – a peaceful joyous welcoming home or workplace? Through our emmeshed sounds, the whole topography of the surrounding landscape can be revealed. Are our sounds creating noise or are they adding value to our place?

Listening is not about listening for sounds – listening is simply about listening to the place, and taking it all in. Being completely present. After deeply listening, we are all affected. We internalize whatever we have listened to. We live out whatever we listen to – through our later interactions with people. Can we hear the music of the place, of the land, and have it move and inspire us?

We are listening creatures, but our listening abilities are destroyed in noisy environments. In noisy environments, we are cut off from a level of intimacy with each other and we are less in touch. We are busy not listening to this, not seeing that, and we end up closing ourselves off to being fully present.

When we are in a relatively quiet place, we can hear all the information. Quiet places generally tend to be secure places, which calm us. No noise is being jammed into us. Quiet places allow us to open up and be receptive and truly listen. When we are truly listening, we may become changed by what we’ve heard. Real listening is about being vulnerable. A great way to practice real listening is to listen to nature, because we aren’t invested at all in what nature says to us. When we really listen to another person, we dare to risk listening to what they really are saying.

Inspired from listening to On Being w/ Krista Tippett – Gordon Hempton – Silence and the Presence of Everything

Stopping Thoughts…

We can naturally stop our thoughts if we focus our attention fully on our in-breath and our out-breath. After one or two minutes of practice, the quality of our breath will improve. Our breath will become deeper, slower, and more harmonious and peaceful, whether we are lying down, sitting, or walking. By practicing mindful breathing, we bring elements of harmony and peace into our bodies.

In a few breaths, our brain chemistry begins to alter – conscious breathwork helps loosen the grip of anxiety, depression, agitation, stress. Our breath helps create a bit of space to see things more clearly, peacefully. If meditation sounds too difficult, perhaps try breathwork.

(inspiration from “Your True Home” by Thich Nhat Hahn)

Asana as an expression of mantra…

Asana = action done with ease and attention.

What if we can change how we experience asana – and have it become an energetic expression of the mantra we are working with, rather than identifying with it as merely as it’s physical form? I’ve been working on my mat with “loving grace” – in every breath, every movement, every posture, I tap into this energy of what it feels like to be in this posture with loving grace. I ask myself what does a loving graceful breath, movement, posture feel like as I’m expressing it. This effort extends to my day – what do my daily routines look and feel like when I’m grounded in loving grace? Working with colleagues in loving grace. Having conversations with family and friends in loving grace. Running errands in loving grace. When I forget, or fall asleep, I wake myself back up and try again. Over time, with practice, we can transform ourselves and our whole experience (perspective) into something more productive for ourselves and our world.

Go Grow!

Breathe In “Serve” Breathe Out “God”

This simple breathing meditation has been incredibly helpful for me and I thought it may be helpful to you, too!

Start becoming aware of your breath and create a slow, deep, even inhale and exhale from your nose. It may be a for a count of 4, 5, or 7 – we all have a different breath cycle, so make it your own deep even breath. As you inhale, meditate on “Serve”. As you exhale, meditate on “God”.

As I move through each moment of my day, I go back to this breathing meditation. When anxiety fills me, or my heart becomes heavy, or my mind starts it’s incessant chitter chatter, I go back to: Inhale Serve, Exhale God. Everything slows down. Crystal clarity returns. Worry resolves itself. Stress melts away. I step back into my true purpose – in each moment, Serve God.

Yoga Videos During Covid

Hello there – I posted a few yoga videos on my YouTube Channel.

I hope this helps yoga practitioners feel well and stay tethered to the peaceful place inside yourself regardless of what’s going on in the world.

With Peace, Love, Inner Light,

Amy

The Best Way To Get Yourself Out Of A Negative Emotional Loop…

Inspired from an article by Eric Barker and neuroscience researcher Alex Korb

What am I grateful for

 

 

 

 

Sometimes we get into these “moods” and it feels like our whole being has a desire to stay stuck in a negative emotion. We know we aren’t being our best versions of ourself, but can’t seem to shift back into positivity, peace, and calm.

The best thing to ask yourself:

What am I grateful for?

Gratitude affects your brain at the biological level. Gratitude boosts the neurotransmitter dopamine.

The benefits of gratitude start with the dopamine system, because feeling grateful activates the brain stem region that produces dopamine. Additionally, gratitude toward others increases activity in social dopamine circuits, which makes social interactions more enjoyable…

Gratitude boosts the neurotransmitter serotonin.

One powerful effect of gratitude is that it can boost serotonin. Trying to think of things you are grateful for forces you to focus on the positive aspects of your life. This simple act increases serotonin production in the anterior cingulate cortex.

Sometimes life gets really messy and negative and it’s hard to find one thing to be grateful for – and guess what, it doesn’t matter – it’s the slowing down to think about gratitude.

It’s not finding gratitude that matters most; it’s remembering to look in the first place. Remembering to be grateful is a form of emotional intelligence. One study found that it actually affected neuron density in both the ventromedial and lateral prefrontal cortex. These density changes suggest that as emotional intelligence increases, the neurons in these areas become more efficient. With higher emotional intelligence, it simply takes less effort to be grateful.

Gratitude is a ripple effect – it helps you feel happier and, if you express gratitute to other people in your life, it extends into those relationships.

Live While You Are Alive…

Live while you are alive…

Learn to be what you are in the seed of your spirit

Learn to free yourself from all the things that have molded you

And which limit your secret and undiscovered road…

Never forget that love

Requires that you be

The greatest person you are capable of being,

Self-generating and strong and gentle –

You are your own hero and star…

Be grateful for life as you live it,

And may a wonderful light

Always guide you along the unfolding road.

To Place The Next Step In A Special Way…

(Inspiration comes from: “The Heart of Yoga”)

Yoga is a practice of observing yourself without judgement. Asana translates as “posture.” The word is derived from the Sanskrit root as which means “to stay,” “to be,” ‘to sit,” or “to be established in a particular position.” An asana has two important qualities – steadiness/alertness and the ability to remain comfortable in a posture. You could take this concept off the yoga mat and into your daily life. Ask, “am I being steady, alert, and comfortable within the position I am in?”

When we practice asanas there is a natural starting point where we begin, just the same as for anything else in life. The starting point for our practice is the condition of our entire being at that present moment. Because we are all changing constantly – our bodies, our minds, our emotions, our energies – even the exact same sequence of postures done in the same way will be a different experience every single time we do them. It is helpful for us to know – be aware – of our whole self so that we can advance step by step, developing our practice in accordance with our abilities.

Developing a yoga practice (life practice) according to this idea is referred to as vinyasa krama. Krama is the step, nyasa means to place, and the prefix vi- translates as “in a special way.” This concept tells us that it is not enough to simply take a step; that step needs to take us in the right direction and be made in the right way.

Perception and Action…

Adapted from “The Heart of Yoga”

How does our perception work? We often determine that we have seen a situation “correctly” and act according to that perception. In reality, however, we have deceived ourselves, and our actions may bring misfortune to ourselves or others. Just as difficult is the situation in which we doubt our understanding of a situation when it is actually correct, and for that reason we take no action, even though doing so would be beneficial. In yoga terminology, this is called Avidya – literally meaning “incorrect comprehension.” The opposite is Vidya, “correct understanding.”

Our incorrect comprehensions are very rooted in us because we often live life through a series of many unconscious actions and ways of perceiving that we have been carrying out for years. As a result of these unconscious responses, the mind has become more and more dependent on habits until we accept the actions of yesterday as the norms of today. Such habituation in our action and perception is called Sam Skara. These habits cover the mind with Avidya, as if obscuring the clarity of consciousness with a filmy layer.

If we are sure we do not clearly understand a given situation, generally speaking we do not act decisively. But if we are clear in our understanding we will act and it will go well for us. Such an action stems from a deep level of perception. In contrast, Avidya is distinguished by superficial perception. I think I see something correctly, so I take a particular action and then later have to admit that I was mistaken and that my actions have not proved beneficial. So we have two levels of perception: One is deep within us and free of this film of Avidya, the other is superficial and obscured by Avidya. Just as our eye is transparent and clear and should not itself be tinted if it is to see colors accurately, so should our perception be like a crystal-clear mirror. One goal of yoga is to reduce this film of Avidya in order to perceive and act correctly.